Dale & Cindy Video - Transcript

TEXT ON-SCREEN and narrator:

DUOPA enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease.

Do not use DUOPA if you take or have taken a nonselective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor within the last 2 weeks.

DUOPA can cause serious side effects, including stomach or intestine problems, and problems from the procedure. Please watch the end of the video for additional important safety information.

TEXT ON-SCREEN:

Dale was on prescribed DUOPA therapy at the time of providing a testimonial.

Changes in therapy may have occurred since that time.

Individual results may vary.

Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, at: https://www.rxabbvie.com/pdf/duopa_pi.pdf

Dale:

I would say, when I think of my life story, when it’s all said and done, I want people to remember that I was a fighter.

Over the course of my career, I did a lot of things for the Air Force including Battle Management Technician, Aircraft Electrician, Medical Service Corps Officer, and contracting specialist.

I finally retired from my civilian job in 2012, right at the time I got diagnosed with Parkinson’s.

TEXT ON-SCREEN:

Dale

PARKINSON’S PATIENT

Dale:

So, I was like, “Welcome to retirement, you got Parkinson’s Disease.”

What I remember about sitting there, I got out of the car and just cried for about 5 minutes.

Cindy:

When Dale was initially diagnosed it actually affected both of us very emotionally.

TEXT ON-SCREEN:

Cindy

DALE’S WIFE

Cindy:

But within a short period of time, I saw him take something that was frightening and make it positive.

He set up this amazing support group.

Dale:

The way you react when life hits you with things, it does define you as a human being. There’s some wonderful people out there that I met in the support group that ... it’s cut them down in their prime of life and I just hate to see that. I feel like I need to be strong for everybody in the group to give others hope.

My doctor first started prescribing for me the carbidopa-levodopa and for a long time, when I took those pills, it felt like I didn’t have Parkinson’s. And as time wore on, I was taking 36 pills a day. So, my day was just ups and downs you know, it’s completely exhausting.

We looked at other options for treatment.

I got hooked up with the Duopa and it’s been awesome. Parkinson’s slowed me down in that area, but it hasn’t stopped me. I get back to my antiques and my tinkering that I like to do. When we decided to get involved in boxing, Cindy got certified and now she’s my coach.

I look forward to the next days, the sun shining. And I look forward to being with Cindy, every day.

Cindy:

He’s written a book and it talks about people with Parkinson’s disease.

Dale:

I'm quite proud of it, it’s a thriller.

The overall message of the book is that it gives people hope.

TEXT ON-SCREEN:

When the impact of disease is unthinkable for patients, it is up to AbbVie to change their stories and to commit to supporting our patients.

Redefine Unthinkable.

It’s time to change course with Duopa.

Talk to your doctor to see if Duopa is right for you.

TEXT ON-SCREEN and narrator:

Do not use DUOPA if you take or have taken a nonselective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor within the last 2 weeks.

Stomach or intestine problems and problems from the procedure you will need to have to receive DUOPA may occur; some of these may require surgery and may lead to death.

Tell your healthcare provider about:

  • stomach pain
  • constipation that does not go away
  • nausea or vomiting
  • fever
  • blood in your stool (dark tarry stool)

DUOPA can cause other serious side effects such as:

  • falling asleep during normal daily activities without warning
  • low blood pressure when you stand or sit up quickly
  • seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not real
  • unusual urges
  • new or worsening depression or thoughts of suicide
  • new or worsened uncontrolled sudden movements
  • progressive weakness, numbness, or loss of sensation in your fingers or feet
  • heart attack or other heart problems (increased blood pressure, a fast or irregular heartbeat, or chest pain)
  • changes in certain blood tests, especially certain hormone and kidney function blood tests
  • worsening of the increased pressure in your eyes (glaucoma)

Suddenly stopping or changing the DUOPA dose may cause withdrawal symptoms such as fever, confusion, or severe muscle stiffness.

The most common side effects of DUOPA include:

  • complications of tubing placement procedure
  • swelling of legs and feet
  • nausea
  • high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • depression
  • and mouth and throat pain

TEXT ON-SCREEN:

Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, at https://www.rxabbvie.com/pdf/duopa_pi.pdf

USE

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and intestine (gastrointestinal) problems and problems from the procedure you will need to have to receive DUOPA (gastrointestinal procedure-related problems) may occur. Some of these problems may require surgery and may lead to death.
    • Serious side effects may include: a blockage of your stomach or intestines (bezoar); stopping movement through intestines (ileus); drainage, redness, swelling, pain, feeling of warmth around the small hole in your stomach wall (stoma); bleeding from stomach ulcers or your intestines; inflammation of your pancreas (pancreatitis); infection in your lungs (pneumonia); air or gas in your abdominal cavity; skin infection around the intestinal tube, pocket of infection (abscess), or infection in your blood (sepsis) or abdominal cavity may occur after surgery; stomach pain, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms of stomach and intestine problems and gastrointestinal procedure-related problems: stomach (abdominal) pain; constipation that does not go away; nausea or vomiting; fever; blood in your stool; or a dark tarry stool.

Your healthcare provider will talk to you about the stoma procedure. Before the stoma procedure, tell your healthcare provider if you ever had a surgery or problems with your stomach.

Talk to your healthcare provider about what you need to do to care for your stoma. After the procedure, you and your healthcare provider will need to regularly check the stoma for any signs of infection.

Do not take DUOPA if you currently take or have recently taken (within 2 weeks) a medication for depression called a non-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure if you take an MAO inhibitor.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using DUOPA with certain other medicines, including medications for high blood pressure, MAO inhibitors, antipsychotics, metoclopramide, isoniazid, and iron or vitamin supplements, may cause serious side effects. High-protein foods may affect how DUOPA works. Tell your healthcare provider if you change your diet.

DUOPA may cause serious side effects. Talk to your doctor before starting DUOPA and while on DUOPA if you have had or have any of these:

  • Falling asleep during normal daily activities without warning. DUOPA may cause you to fall asleep while you are doing daily activities such as driving, which may result in an accident. This can happen as late as one year after starting DUOPA. Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how DUOPA affects you. Tell your healthcare provider if you take medicines that can make you sleepy, such as sleep medicines, antidepressants, or antipsychotics.
  • Low blood pressure when you stand or sit up quickly. After you have been sitting or lying down, stand up slowly to help reduce dizziness, nausea, sweating, or fainting until you know how DUOPA affects you.
  • Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not real (hallucinations).
  • Unusual urges. Some people taking medicines for Parkinson's disease, including DUOPA, have reported urges such as excessive gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping, and increased sex drive.
  • Depression and suicide. DUOPA can cause or worsen depression. Pay close attention to changes in your mood, behavior, thoughts, or feelings. Call your healthcare provider right away if you feel depressed or have thoughts of suicide.
  • Uncontrolled sudden movements (dyskinesia). If you have new dyskinesia or your dyskinesia gets worse, tell your healthcare provider. This may be a sign that your dose of DUOPA or other Parkinson's medicines may need to be adjusted.
  • Progressive weakness or numbness or loss of sensation in the fingers or feet (neuropathy).
  • Heart attack or other heart problems. Tell your healthcare provider if you have experienced increased blood pressure, a fast or irregular heartbeat, or chest pain.
  • Abnormal blood tests. DUOPA may cause changes in certain blood tests, especially certain hormone and kidney function blood tests.
  • Worsening of the increased pressure in your eyes (glaucoma). The pressure in your eyes should be checked after starting DUOPA.

Do not stop using DUOPA or change your dose unless you are told to do so by your healthcare provider. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop withdrawal symptoms such as fever, confusion, or severe muscle stiffness.

The most common side effects of DUOPA include: complications of tubing placement procedure, swelling of legs and feet, nausea, high blood pressure (hypertension), depression, and mouth and throat pain.

Please see the full Prescribing Information including Medication Guide for additional information about DUOPA. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you are having difficulty paying for your medicine, AbbVie may be able to help. Visit AbbVie.com/myAbbVieAssist to learn more.

US-DUOP-200201

USE

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION 

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and instestine (gastrointestinal) problems and problems from the procedure you will need to have to receive DUOPA (gastrointestinal procedure-related problems)

USE

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION 

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and instestine (gastrointestinal) 

USE

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION 

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and instestine (gastrointestinal) problems and problems from the procedure you will need to have to receive DUOPA (gastrointestinal procedure-related problems)

USE

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION 

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and instestine (gastrointestinal)

USE

DUOPA (carbidopa and levodopa) enteral suspension is a prescription medicine used for treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. DUOPA contains two medicines: carbidopa and levodopa.

Important Safety Information

What is the most important safety information I should know about DUOPA?

  • Stomach and intestine (gastrointestinal) problems and problems from the procedure you will need to have to receive DUOPA (gastrointestinal procedure-related problems) may occur. Some of these problems may require surgery and may lead to death.
    • Serious side effects may include: a blockage of your stomach or intestines (bezoar); stopping movement through intestines (ileus); drainage, redness, swelling, pain, feeling of warmth around the small hole in your stomach wall (stoma); bleeding from stomach ulcers or your intestines; inflammation of your pancreas (pancreatitis); infection in your lungs (pneumonia); air or gas in your abdominal cavity; skin infection around the intestinal tube, pocket of infection (abscess), or infection in your blood (sepsis) or abdominal cavity may occur after surgery; stomach pain, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms of stomach and intestine problems and gastrointestinal procedure-related problems: stomach (abdominal) pain; constipation that does not go away; nausea or vomiting; fever; blood in your stool; or a dark tarry stool.

Your healthcare provider will talk to you about the stoma procedure. Before the stoma procedure, tell your healthcare provider if you ever had a surgery or problems with your stomach.

Talk to your healthcare provider about what you need to do to care for your stoma. After the procedure, you and your healthcare provider will need to regularly check the stoma for any signs of infection.

Do not take DUOPA if you currently take or have recently taken (within 2 weeks) a medication for depression called a non-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor. Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure if you take an MAO inhibitor.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Using DUOPA with certain other medicines, including medications for high blood pressure, MAO inhibitors, antipsychotics, metoclopramide, isoniazid, and iron or vitamin supplements, may cause serious side effects. High-protein foods may affect how DUOPA works. Tell your healthcare provider if you change your diet.

DUOPA may cause serious side effects. Talk to your doctor before starting DUOPA and while on DUOPA if you have had or have any of these:

  • Falling asleep during normal daily activities without warning. DUOPA may cause you to fall asleep while you are doing daily activities such as driving, which may result in an accident. This can happen as late as one year after starting DUOPA. Do not drive or operate machinery until you know how DUOPA affects you. Tell your healthcare provider if you take medicines that can make you sleepy, such as sleep medicines, antidepressants, or antipsychotics.
  • Low blood pressure when you stand or sit up quickly. After you have been sitting or lying down, stand up slowly to help reduce dizziness, nausea, sweating, or fainting until you know how DUOPA affects you.
  • Seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not real (hallucinations).
  • Unusual urges. Some people taking medicines for Parkinson's disease, including DUOPA, have reported urges such as excessive gambling, compulsive eating, compulsive shopping, and increased sex drive.
  • Depression and suicide. DUOPA can cause or worsen depression. Pay close attention to changes in your mood, behavior, thoughts, or feelings. Call your healthcare provider right away if you feel depressed or have thoughts of suicide.
  • Uncontrolled sudden movements (dyskinesia). If you have new dyskinesia or your dyskinesia gets worse, tell your healthcare provider. This may be a sign that your dose of DUOPA or other Parkinson's medicines may need to be adjusted.
  • Progressive weakness or numbness or loss of sensation in the fingers or feet (neuropathy).
  • Heart attack or other heart problems. Tell your healthcare provider if you have experienced increased blood pressure, a fast or irregular heartbeat, or chest pain.
  • Abnormal blood tests. DUOPA may cause changes in certain blood tests, especially certain hormone and kidney function blood tests.
  • Worsening of the increased pressure in your eyes (glaucoma). The pressure in your eyes should be checked after starting DUOPA.

Do not stop using DUOPA or change your dose unless you are told to do so by your healthcare provider. Tell your healthcare provider if you develop withdrawal symptoms such as fever, confusion, or severe muscle stiffness.

The most common side effects of DUOPA include: complications of tubing placement procedure, swelling of legs and feet, nausea, high blood pressure (hypertension), depression, and mouth and throat pain.

Please see the full Prescribing Information including Medication Guide for additional information about DUOPA. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have questions.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

If you are having difficulty paying for your medicine, AbbVie may be able to help. Visit AbbVie.com/myAbbVieAssist to learn more.

US-DUOP-200201